Resolving the Monitoring Problem: The Hidden Value of “Worthless” Weapons Inspections

I will be giving a presentation at the Peter D. Watson Seminar Series next week on why weapons inspections are useful. Here’s the abstract:

Abstract: How do weapons inspections alter international bargaining environments? While conventional wisdom focuses on informational aspects, this paper focuses on inspections’ impact on the cost of a potential program–weapons inspectors shut down the most efficient avenues to development, forcing rising states to pursue more costly means to develop arms. To demonstrate the corresponding positive effects, this paper develops a model of negotiating over hidden weapons programs in the shadow of preventive war. If the cost of arms is large, efficient agreements are credible even if declining states cannot observe violations. However, if the cost is small, a commitment problem leads to positive probability of preventive war and costly weapons investment. Equilibrium welfare under this second outcome is mutually inferior to the equilibrium welfare of the first outcome. Consequently, both rising states and declining states benefit from weapons inspections even if those inspections cannot reveal all private information.

Download the paper here.
Download the slides here.

One response to “Resolving the Monitoring Problem: The Hidden Value of “Worthless” Weapons Inspections

  1. Pingback: Assorted Thoughts on Iran | William Spaniel

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