Does Increasing the Costs of Conflict Decrease the Probability of War?

warplot

With Iris Malone. Revise and resubmit, Journal of Politics.

Abstract: International relations bargaining theory predicts that increasing the costs of war makes conflict less likely, but some crises emerge after the potential costs of conflict have increased. Why? We show that a non-monotonic relationship exists between the costs of conflict and the probability of war when there is uncertainty about resolve. Under these conditions, increasing the costs of an uninformed party’s opponent has a second-order effect of exacerbating informational asymmetries. We derive precise conditions under which fighting can occur more frequently and empirically showcase the model’s implications through a case study of Sino-Indian relations from 1949 to 2007. As the model predicts, we show that the 1962 Sino-Indian war occurred after a major trade agreement went into effect because uncertainty over Chinese resolve led India to issue aggressive screening offers over a border dispute and gamble on the risk of conflict.

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One response to “Does Increasing the Costs of Conflict Decrease the Probability of War?

  1. Pingback: Does Increasing the Costs of Conflict Decrease the Probability of War? | William Spaniel

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